Don’t miss Prescott’s Textiles & Textures Artisans Studio

Colorful sand cast leaves by artist Chris Ryback

Custom wood vases created by artists Roger and Jan Harlow

If you’re headed to Prescott for Fourth of July festivities, consider adding to your itinerary a visit to Textiles & Textures Artisans Studio.

Located at 217 North Cortez Street (the same street with all those cool antique shops), Textiles & Textures is steps away from the Courthouse Plaza in downtown Prescott. The shop which opened for business a few months ago, is run by sisters Debra Owen and Donna Stirnaman.

To put it mildly, this studio/shop is a showcase of unusual and unique art and crafts. To put it more accurately, Textiles & Textures is so colorful and crafty you’ll think the popular website, Etsy.com exploded from the Internet into a downtown Prescott storefront! Much of the media is textiles, paper, wood, stone and ceramics. I was really impressed by all the racks of upcycled children’s clothing. That’s what this gallery-studio-store-workshop is all about: upcycling, re-imagining just about anything. If you’re unfamiliar with the term, “upcycling,” think of it this way: Converting a used but colorful, print dress into a dust cloth is recycling; converting it into several sets of children’s pajamas is upcycling.

When we visited the shop during a recent Prescott visit, studio employees were busily designing new exhibits. Owners and staff were preparing for an event called “Tie One On Art Challenge,” an open call for art — a competition for artists and crafters to create works from men’s ties. Although the entry deadline has past, the competition submissions will be judged and exhibited July 2-28. A reception will feature the works Friday June 28 during the downtown Prescott Fourth Friday Art Walk. Check for more events and numerous photos on Textiles & Textures’ Facebook page.

The studio also offers a variety of classes and workshops, such as drawing and creating art journals. An upcoming workshop, beginning July 20, is Rag Papermaking by Annie Alexander. Participants will learn how to handcraft forms of paper to be used either as an art medium, or for a more functional purpose such as writing paper, cards or envelopes. Alexander’s paper art and original artist books also are available at the studio to purchase… or simply admire. Textiles & Textures’ shelves also boast creations by Chino Valley artists Roger and Jan Harlow. Find turned bowls, vases, tables, platters and more — executed from exotic wood pieces from throughout the world. Another noteworthy display includes large, colorful sand cast leaves by artist Chris Ryback.

Jewelry, apparel, painting, metal sculptures, art quilts, ceramics and paper art  — they’re all here. If you thought some of these crafts were “lost arts,” then consider them “found” at Textiles & Textures Artisans Studio. 

Bright spring and summer fashions in the Kids Corner at Textiles & Textures

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Randall House Restaurant and Gift Shop in Pine, Ariz.

Randall House sign

If this Memorial Day weekend is typical of almost any other three-day weekend, Arizonans will take to the freeways, streets and back roads en route to high country campgrounds and resorts, in search of cooler temperatures. Motorists planning a drive through Pine, Arizona will want to stop for breakfast or lunch at the historic Randall House Restaurant and Gift Shop.

Randall House certainly isn’t new. The restaurant has been in operation since 1998. But not all visitors realize that this pioneer home was once a popular community gathering place. Some may not know how pioneer homeowner Mary Ellen Randall would invite nearby residents for pastries and coffee on their way to and from the post office. During the early 1900s, Mrs. Randall was not only famous for her homemade breads, muffins, cookies and pies, but she was also known for her generous hospitality. She had a knack for making everyone feel at home. On their way home from school, children would stop by the Randall’s home for freshly baked cookies. Current restaurateurs Barbara and Patrick O’Connor are continuing Mary Ellen Randall’s tradition of warmth and hospitality — and homemade cooking.

The restaurant, located at the original Randall home site and serves breakfast and lunch Wednesdays through Sundays, is a historic point of interest. Visitors can peer through glass openings in the walls to see a log and adobe section of the original cabin. The first dwelling was constructed by Alfred Jason Randall in 1881. Alfred’s grandson George Randall with his wife Mary Ellen lived at this home for much of the 20th century. George passed away in 1987. In 1998, following Mary Ellen’s death, the building was restored and remodeled by the O’Connors, who then transformed it into a restaurant. Mrs. Randall would be pleased.

 

 

kitchen

Randall House dining room resembles a farmhouse kitchen

On a recent visit, our server invited us to have a tour the restaurant and grounds. While waiting for our meal, I strolled around the back of the home to see the backyard and outbuildings, as well as the tiny library, picnic tables, walking paths and gardens that compose the adjoining Randall Park. While walking through each of the interior dining rooms at Randall House, I realized that this more than just a casual breakfast and lunch spot. It’s also a gift shop. Wooden corner cupboards support unique toys, crafts and goodies ‘to go.’ After your meal, I recommend browsing for kitchen gifts such as colorful aprons, trivet holders, counter canisters, cutting boards or specialty toys like hobbyhorses, crafts kits and wooden puzzles.

About the food and service: I had no complaints, but after all, it was just our first visit. However, our service wasn’t nearly as slow as the consensus from the reviews sites describes. After I spent a few minutes walking through the restaurant and around the grounds, snapping a few photos and I came back to my table, lunch was served. Since it was Cinco de Mayo, I had ordered the featured lunch special of fish tacos  — a set of nicely grilled tilapia with a side of tasty slaw. My husband had a taco salad, which he said was very tasty and filling.

 

meal

Lunch special: Tilapia fish tacos with cole slaw

As I walked through the dining rooms, I saw a large group of women who had just finished their meals and were preparing to leave. As I waited for them to walk out so I take a photo, I noticed their plates, still on the table. They were empty! All of these gals had completely cleaned their plates! Whatever they ordered must have been well worth every crumb!

Randall House is known for its quaint, country style dining, homemade, made-to-order breakfasts of quiche, pancakes, French toast, omelets, muffins and scones. The same is true for its lunches: hearty sandwiches, wraps, soups and salads. But don’t think this place is just for ladies’ luncheons. The portions appear ample enough to fill up the hungriest of ‘he-men.’ This I know first hand — it’s one advantage to sitting on the front patio: you can witness the satisfied expressions on well-fed, departing patrons.

patio

Randall House: historic home, pleasant patio, gift shop and restaurant

Readers: What are your favorite eateries in Mogollon Rim Country?